Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Dotted Loosestrife (Lysimachia punctata)


Also known as Spotted Loosestrife, this garden escape is an elegant, upright, perennial which grows to a height of over 120 cm favouring roadsides, waste ground and grassland as its habitat. From June to September, it bears clusters of five-petalled yellow flowers (15 – 20 mm) on short stalks in the axils of the stem leaves. The petals are fringed with dense glandular hairs. Unlike Yellow Loosestrife, the opposite, downy, ovate leaves are never black-dotted but have hairy margins.

Primrose Family,

17/9/14
Dog Mill Pond

Flower

Leaf

Environment

Plant

Sedum sp


Sedum is a large genus of flowering plants in the family Crassulaceae, members of which are commonly known as stonecrops. The genus has been described as containing up to 600 species [2] of leaf succulents that are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, varying from annual and creeping herbs to shrubs. The plants have water-storing leaves. The flowers usually have five petals, seldom four or six. There are typically twice as many stamens as petals.(LINK)

 Stonecrop family,

7/10/14
Dog Mill Pond

Flower


17/9/14
Dog Mill Pond





Shining Crane's-Bill (Geranium lucidum)


Shining cranesbill demands relatively high summer temperatures, a long growing period and a long, frost-free autumn. Even in suitable climates, however, it doesn’t grow just anywhere: typical nitrogenous soils that it clearly favours include ridges, cracks and crags on bird rocks, e.g. in Finland’s outer archipelago, where it often grows in the shade of hedges. Sometimes it also grows in the calciferous soil of the archipelago, but in such cases the growing medium has most likely been enhanced by birds’ droppings. As shining cranesbill carpels ripen they usually break off and fall to the mother plant’s roots. The species doesn’t seem to spread very efficiently over long journeys, which would explain why it has failed to establish itself in habitats that appear suitable. (LINK)

Crane's-bill Family

17/9/14
Dog Mill Pond


Leaf


Hedge Bedstraw (Galium mollugo)


,A sprawling and scrambling, medium to tall grassland perennial. In common with most other bedstraws, hedge bedstraw has a square stem with whorls of undivided leaves and clusters of small white four petalled flowers. Distinguishable from other similar bedstraws by its smooth stem and relatively broad leaves (no more than five times long as wide). Could be confused with Heath bedstraw but differs in habitat and the seeds (actually small dry fruit) differ.
Bedstraw Family

19/6/15
Tong Park/ Baildon
Plant

Flower




17/9/14
Dog Mill Pond

Plant

Flower

Leaves

Leaf tip

Flowers

Hedgerow Crane's-Bill (Geranium pyrenaicum)



,Hedgerow cranesbill has most likely arrived in Finland and the Nordic countries in general with people. It’s possible that it’s native to the south of Finland, but in any case its original area of distribution has been a lot smaller than it is today. Hedgerow cranesbill is nowadays quite widely spread, although it is rather rare and grows sporadically. It is not a particularly popular ornamental plant in Finland, even though it has few demands and its long flowering time compensates for the small size of its flowers.

Hedgerow cranesbill can be confused with small annual and biennial members of the Geranium family that grow as weeds in mainly the same habitats. The most common of these in Finland are small-flowered cranesbill (G. pusillum) and sometimes Dove’s-foot cranesbill (G. molle), although their flowers are clearly smaller and their petals are not deeply lobed. (LINK)

 Crane's-bill Family,
17/9/14
Dog Mill Pond

Environment
Leaf
Flower

Ivy (Hedera helix)


 Common ivy is a popular ornamental, valued for its ability to thrive in shady places, provide excellent groundcover and cover unsightly walls, sheds and tree stumps. Many cultivars are available, including variegated forms that can be used to brighten shady depths of winter gardens.

Long collected for winter decorations, common ivy is associated with Christmas and frequently features in festive designs. It is also an important source of food and shelter for wildlife during winter.

Ivy is not a parasite, does not normally damage sound buildings or walls, and is rarely a threat to healthy trees. Regular trimming can prevent ivy becoming too heavy, a problem that can be exacerbated by the additional weight of rain and snow.(LINK)



Ivy Family
17/9/14
Park