Monday, 25 May 2015

Meadow Foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis)



known as the meadow foxtail[1] or the field meadow foxtail, is a perennial grass belonging to the grass family (Poaceae). It is native to Europe and Asia.

This common plant is found on grasslands, especially on neutral soils. It is found on moist, fertile soils, but avoids waterlogged, light or dry soils. The species forms dense swards leading to low botanical diversity.


This species is widely cultivated for pasture and hay, and has become naturalised in many areas outside of its native range, including Australia and North America.(link)






24/5/15
Park/Grass







Grasses, Rushes & Sedges Nature spot link


Bitter Vetch (Lathyrus linifolius)



 Lathyrus linifolius is a species of pea, commonly called bitter vetch or heath pea. The name bitter vetch is also sometimes used for Vicia ervilia and also for Vicia orobus. The tubers of Lathyrus linifolius were formerly used as an appetite suppressant in medieval Scotland, and this use has brought the plant to recent medical attention. Attempts are being made to cultivate the plant on a commercial scale.(link)


 Fabaceae Family,

23/5/15
Blubberhouse
****NEW **** 2015
Flower

Leaf
Environment



Sunday, 24 May 2015

Winter-cress (Barbarea vulgaris)


Barbarea vulgaris, also called as bittercressherb barbararocketcressyellow rocketcresswinter rocket, and wound rocket, is a biennial herb of the genus Barbarea, belonging to the family Brassicaceae.

Cabbage Family,



24/5/15
 Burley by-pass



24/5/15
Park




Bistort (Persicaria bistorta)




The spikes of delicate pink flowers of Common Bistort can crowd damp places such as wet meadows or pastures and roadside verges. In bloom from June to August, this pretty flower goes by a different name in the north of England: 'Pudding Dock' (or sometimes 'Passion Dock'). This is because it was commonly used to create a traditional pudding around Eastertime, probably originating as a cleansing, bitter dish for Lent. Nowadays, many local places have their own take on the basic recipe of Common Bistort leaves, nettles, onions, oatmeal and bacon fat.

How to identify


Common Bistort displays cylindrical, pink flower spikes in summer; the triangular or heart-shaped leaves appear from spring onwards, and decrease in size up the stem.


Where to find it


Grows across the UK, but most common in Wales and the north of England.

(link)

 Knotweed Family,

23/5/15
Blubberhouse

****First recorded *****
Flower

Flower

Environment

Leaf



Friday, 22 May 2015

Cornsalad (Valerianella)






Corn salad’s year begins in the autumn, when the seeds germinate and quickly develop small overwintering leaf rosettes. The following spring the development happens so fast that the flower blooms already in May. Its small, light blue flowers are mainly self-pollinating, but sometimes insects visit their minimal nectar store too and at the same time deliver pollen from one flower to another. The fruits ripen at the beginning of high summer and float to new habitats with the aid of an air pocket.(link)



 Honeysuckle Family

22/5/15
Gaeden


Flower

Plant


Also known as Lamb's Lettuce, this plant was introduced into the kitchen garden by Louis XIV's gardener, having previously been a crop used by the peasant class.  It can be found in European markets in spring when the taste is at its most mild.  The name Lamb's Lettuce is thought to be a reference to the fact that it tastes best during the lambing season.  It is highly nutritious, containing vitamins C, E and B9 and also beta carotene.(link)


Thursday, 14 May 2015

Large Bitter-Cress (Cardamine amara)



Large Bitter-cress is a native, perennial herb growing up to 60cm.
It has a horizontal creeping stock from which stolons and stems grow.
Flowers are up to 13mm across, with 4 white petals and 5 lilac-purple anthers.
Leaves are pale green and pinnate. There is no basal rosette.
It spreads to form patches when the creeping stems and stolons root at the nodes.

 Cabbage Family,

10/5/15
Park/bog


7/5/14
Park/bog
Growing in scrub/ boggy area.

Flower
Plant


Leaves

Environment

Leaf


16/5/14
Park


Wednesday, 6 May 2015

Greater Stitchwort (Stellaria holosteal)



4/4/15
Yeadon banks

Greater Stitchwort has five white petals, each deeply notched and almost divided into two. Its green leaves are grass-like in appearance and its brittle stems are square. Greater Stitchwort has larger flowers (2-3cm across) than its relative, Lesser Stitchwort (0.5-1cm across).  (link)